Category Archives: Publications

H. Houghton, The Latin New Testament, A Guide to its Early History, Texts, and Manuscripts

The Latin New Testament

A Guide to its Early History, Texts, and Manuscripts

H. A. G. Houghton

9780198744733

  • The first English-language book dealing with the whole of the Latin New Testament
  • Offers a comprehensive introduction to the history and text of this fundamental work of Western culture
  • Provides a new account of the history of the biblical text for more than a millennium and a user’s guide to the principal editions and resources for further study
  • Includes illustrations of key manuscripts as well as links to online resources
  • This is an indispensable guide for scholars and students of the text of the New Testament, and provides an orientation for historians, theologians, medievalists, linguists, and all those interested in the manuscript heritage of Christianity in Europe.

Order the book at the Oxford University Press

It can be downloaded as a PDF from a link in the top right-hand corner of the catalogue entry at:
https://global.oup.com/academic/product/the-latin-new-testament-9780198744733

or the direct link:
http://fdslive.oup.com/www.oup.com/academic/pdf/openaccess/9780198744733.pdf

It may also be accessed in the Oxford Scholarship online platform:
http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198744733.001.0001/acprof-9780198744733

Latin is the language in which the New Testament was copied, read, and studied for over a millennium. The remains of the initial ‘Old Latin’ version preserve important testimony for early forms of text and the way in which the Bible was understood by the first translators. Successive revisions resulted in a standard version subsequently known as the Vulgate which, along with the creation of influential commentaries by scholars such as Jerome and Augustine, shaped theology and exegesis for many centuries. Latin gospel books and other New Testament manuscripts illustrate the continuous tradition of Christian book culture, from the late antique codices of Roman North Africa and Italy to the glorious creations of Northumbrian scriptoria, the pandects of the Carolingian era, eleventh-century Giant Bibles, and the Paris Bibles associated with the rise of the university.

In The Latin New Testament, H.A.G. Houghton provides a comprehensive introduction to the history and development of the Latin New Testament. Drawing on major editions and recent advances in scholarship, he offers a new synthesis which brings together evidence from Christian authors and biblical manuscripts from earliest times to the late Middle Ages. All manuscripts identified as containing Old Latin evidence for the New Testament are described in a catalogue, along with those featured in the two principal modern editions of the Vulgate. A user’s guide is provided for these editions and the other key scholarly tools for studying the Latin New Testament.

Google also offers the following word cloud for the book:

New book : Peter W. Martens, Origen and Scripture: The Contours of the Exegetical Life, Oxford University Press, 2012, 352 pp, $125.

“Scriptural interpretatioPeter W. Martens, Origen and Scripturen was an important form of scholarship for Christians in late antiquity. For no one does this claim ring more true than Origen of Alexandria (185-254), one of the most prolific scholars of Scripture in early Christianity. This book examines his approach to the Bible through a biographical lens: the focus is on his account of the scriptural interpreter, the animating centre of the exegetical enterprise. In pursuing this largely neglected line of inquiry, Peter W. Martens discloses the contours of Origen’s sweeping vision of scriptural exegesis as a way of life. For Origen, ideal interpreters were far more than philologists steeped in the skills conveyed by Greco-Roman education. Their profile also included a commitment to Christianity from which they gathered a spectrum of loyalties, guidelines, dispositions, relationships and doctrines that tangibly shaped how they practiced and thought about their biblical scholarship. The study explores the many ways in which Origen thought ideal scriptural interpreters (himself included) embarked upon a way of life, indeed a way of salvation, culminating in the everlasting contemplation of God. This new and integrative thesis takes seriously how the discipline of scriptural interpretation was envisioned by one of its pioneering and most influential practitioners.”

Click here for a discussion with Peter W. Martens on his book

 

 

Digital Humanities in Biblical, Early Jewish and Early Christian Studies

Leiden: Brill, 2013.
Edited by Claire Clivaz, University of Lausanne, Andrew Gregory, University of Oxford and David Hamidović, University of Lausanne,
in collaboration with Sara Schulthess, University of Lausanne
 
“Ancient texts, once written by hand on parchment and papyrus, are now increasingly discoverable online in newly digitized editions, and their readers now work online as well as in traditional libraries. So what does this mean for how scholars may now engage with these texts, and for how the disciplines of biblical, Jewish and Christian studies might develop? These are the questions that contributors to this volume address. Subjects discussed include textual criticism, palaeography, philology, the nature of ancient monotheism, and how new tools and resources such as blogs, wikis, databases and digital publications may transform the ways in which contemporary scholars engage with historical sources. Contributors attest to the emergence of a conscious recognition of something new in the way that we may now study ancient writings, and the possibilities that this new awareness raises.”

Contents

Part one: Digitized manuscripts

The Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library. The Digitization Project of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Pnina Shor)
Dead Sea Scrolls inside Digital Humanities. A Sample (David Hamidović)
The Electronic Scriptorium: Markup for New Testament Manuscripts (Hugh Houghton)
Digital Arabic Gospels Corpus (Elie Dannaoui)
The Role of the Internet in New Testament Textual Criticism: The Example of the Arabic Manuscripts of the New Testament (Sara Schulthess)
The Falasha Memories Project. Digitalization of the Manuscript BNF, Ethiopien d’Abbadie 107 (Charlotte Touati)

Part two: Digital academic research and publishing

The Seventy and Their 21st-Century Heirs. The Prospects for Digital Septuagint Research (Juan Garcés)
Digital Approaches to the Study of Ancient Monotheism (Ory Amitay)
Internet Networks and Academic Research: The Example of the New Testament Textual Criticism (Claire Clivaz)
New Ways of Searching with Biblindex, the Online Index of Biblical Quotations in Early Christian Literature (Laurence Mellerin)
Aspects of Polysemy in Biblical Greek. A Preliminary Study for a New Lexicographical Resource (Romina Vergari)
Publishing Digitally at the University Press? A Reader’s Perspective (Andrew Gregory)
Does Biblical Studies Deserve to Be an Open Source Discipline? (Russell Hobson)

Book on early Christianity : The Dead Sea Scrolls and Pauline Literature

The Dead Sea Scrolls and Pauline Literature
Edited by Jean-Sébastien Rey , Université de Lorraine

<http://www.brill.com/products/book/dead-sea-scrolls-and-pauline-literature>
€121,00   $166.00
ISBN13: 9789004227033
E-ISBN: 9789004230071
Publication Year: 2013
BRILL

The relationships between Pauline literature and the Dead Sea scrolls have fascinated specialists ever since the latter were first
discovered. Now that all the Qumran scrolls have been published, it is
possible to see more clearly the amplitude and impact of this corpus
on first century Judaism. This book offers some syntheses of the
results obtained in the last decades, and also opens up new
perspectives, by highlighting similarities and indicating possible
relationships between these various writings within Mediterranean
Judaism. In addition, the authors wish to show how certain traditions
spread, evolve and are reconfigured in ancient Judaism as they meet
new religious, cultural and social challenges.

Publication: Biblical Quotations in Patristic Texts

L. Mellerin, H.A.G. Houghton (eds), Biblical Quotations in Patristic Texts, Studia Patristica LIV, vol. 2 (Papers presented at the Sixteenth International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 2011, M. Vinzent ed.), Leuven-Paris-Walpole, MA 2013.

Summary

This fascicle presents papers given at a workshop devoted to biblical quotations in patristic texts at the Sixteenth International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford in August 2011, which brought together representatives from four European institutes and research projects active in this field. Additional contributions have been supplied from further initiatives run by two of these institutes: the seminar series of the Institut des Sources Chrétiennes in Lyon and the Seventh Birmingham Colloquium on the Textual Criticism of the New Testament, held in April 2011, which focussed on Christian writers and the New Testament text.

http://www.peeters-leuven.be/boekoverz.asp?nr=9344