Tag Archives: Digital humanities

Gregory Crane: June 1914 and Philology for the 21st Century

Gregory Crane: June 1914 and Philology for the 21st Century

Gregory CraneOn the sidelines of the workshop about text-reuse (see http://biblindex.hypotheses.org/1686) held from June 2 to 4,
Gregory Crane, head of the Perseus Project at Tufts University, holder of The Humboldt Chair of Digital Humanities at the University of Leipzig which launched the Open Philology Project, gave a public lecture on Tuesday, 3rd June 2014 at the Maison de l’Orient et de la Méditerranée in Lyon.

See the slideshow
Download the poster

June 1914 and Philology for the 21st Century

We are approaching the one hundred year anniversary of the First World War. Philology was never more prestigious than it was a century ago but what what, if anything, did it do to counteract the threads of nationalism that led to the disasters of the twentieth century? Far as Europe has come a hundred years later, the vast majority of those who engage with historical languages such as Greek and Latin are secondary school students – at least 3 million of them across Europe – who experience these languages in their national languages and in isolation from their counterparts across linguistic, if not national, boundaries. We are, however, now poised to develop a new philology, one optimized for a global society, with editions designed to serve many linguistic and cultural communities. Digital technologies provide enabling mechanisms for this new philology but a global philology requires as well a new conception of the relationship between professionalized scholarship and human society, both within Europe and beyond. We have many technological opportunities but the major task before us to assess what sort of scholarly community we wish to support. We have a chance to develop a global republic of letters, one that fosters a true dialogue across civilizations but we must make decisions in the present if we are to pursue changes in the future. This talk goes over possibilities and challenges involved.

Digital Humanities in Biblical, Early Jewish and Early Christian Studies

Leiden: Brill, 2013.
Edited by Claire Clivaz, University of Lausanne, Andrew Gregory, University of Oxford and David Hamidović, University of Lausanne,
in collaboration with Sara Schulthess, University of Lausanne
 
“Ancient texts, once written by hand on parchment and papyrus, are now increasingly discoverable online in newly digitized editions, and their readers now work online as well as in traditional libraries. So what does this mean for how scholars may now engage with these texts, and for how the disciplines of biblical, Jewish and Christian studies might develop? These are the questions that contributors to this volume address. Subjects discussed include textual criticism, palaeography, philology, the nature of ancient monotheism, and how new tools and resources such as blogs, wikis, databases and digital publications may transform the ways in which contemporary scholars engage with historical sources. Contributors attest to the emergence of a conscious recognition of something new in the way that we may now study ancient writings, and the possibilities that this new awareness raises.”

Contents

Part one: Digitized manuscripts

The Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library. The Digitization Project of the Dead Sea Scrolls (Pnina Shor)
Dead Sea Scrolls inside Digital Humanities. A Sample (David Hamidović)
The Electronic Scriptorium: Markup for New Testament Manuscripts (Hugh Houghton)
Digital Arabic Gospels Corpus (Elie Dannaoui)
The Role of the Internet in New Testament Textual Criticism: The Example of the Arabic Manuscripts of the New Testament (Sara Schulthess)
The Falasha Memories Project. Digitalization of the Manuscript BNF, Ethiopien d’Abbadie 107 (Charlotte Touati)

Part two: Digital academic research and publishing

The Seventy and Their 21st-Century Heirs. The Prospects for Digital Septuagint Research (Juan Garcés)
Digital Approaches to the Study of Ancient Monotheism (Ory Amitay)
Internet Networks and Academic Research: The Example of the New Testament Textual Criticism (Claire Clivaz)
New Ways of Searching with Biblindex, the Online Index of Biblical Quotations in Early Christian Literature (Laurence Mellerin)
Aspects of Polysemy in Biblical Greek. A Preliminary Study for a New Lexicographical Resource (Romina Vergari)
Publishing Digitally at the University Press? A Reader’s Perspective (Andrew Gregory)
Does Biblical Studies Deserve to Be an Open Source Discipline? (Russell Hobson)

Digital Humanities Congress 2012, University of Sheffield, 6th – 8th September 2012

Call for Papers
Deadline : 30th april 2012

The University of Sheffield’s Humanities Research Institute with the support of the Network of Expert Centres and Centernet is delighted to announce its Call for Papers for a three-day conference to be held in Sheffield during 6th – 8th September 2012.

The Digital Humanities Congress is a new conference which will be held in Sheffield every two years. Its purpose is to promote the sharing of knowledge, ideas and techniques within the digital humanities.

Digital humanities is understood by Sheffield to mean the use of technology within arts, heritage and humanities research as both a method of inquiry and a means of dissemination. As such, proposals related to all disciplines within the arts, humanities and heritage domains are welcome.

The conference will take place at the University’s new residential conference facility, The Edge.

Keynote Speakers

Professor Andrew Prescott (Head of Department, Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London)
Professor Lorna Hughes (University of Wales Chair in Digital Collections at the National Library of Wales)
Professor Philip Ethington (Professor of History and Political Science, University of Southern California and Co-Director of the USC Center for Transformative Scholarship)

Submitting a Proposal

We welcome proposals on all aspects of the digital humanities. For example, proposals might wish to focus on:

– New knowledge and insights within areas of humanities research which have arisen from the use of digital applications, techniques or methodologies. These proposals might focus on how specific research questions were solved.
– Case studies, best practice and evolving trends concerning the development of research resources, tools, frameworks and environments within the humanities, such as digital editions, mobile applications, virtual worlds, surface computing, web services and GIS.
– Technologies and techniques which bring value to humanities research, such as data mining, crowd-sourcing, linked data, text encoding, digitisation, ontology building, sentiment analysis, augmented reality, 3D visualisation and virtual worlds.
– Standards, best practice and case studies for data creation, data collection, development methodologies, usability testing, preservation, sustainability and accessibility.
– Issues and emerging trends within the technology and the information environment which do or might impact on humanities research. This might concern new technology, social trends, infrastructure, policy, funding, assessing value or pedagogy.

Proposals are welcome from academics, researchers, postgraduate students, professionals from within the cultural, heritage and information sectors, technologists and SMEs. Proposals are welcome from UK and international contributors.

Contributors can propose individual papers or sessions of three or more papers on a related theme.

Proposals for Individual Papers

Proposals for individual papers should include:

– The name of the speaker
– The speaker’s institution
– The title of the paper
– An abstract of approximately 300 words

Individual papers will be to a maximum of 20 minutes duration. Each paper will then be allotted a further 10 minutes for questions.

Proposals for Sessions

Proposals for sessions should include:

– The name of the session organiser and his/her institution
– The names of the individual speakers and their institutions
– The title of the session
– An abstract of approximately 200 words which describes the theme that unifies the session
– The titles of the session papers
– Abstracts for each paper within the session of approximately 300 words

Sessions will consist of three or more papers on a related theme to a maximum of 60 minutes. Each session will then be allotted a further 30 minutes for questions.

Submission Process and Deadline

Proposals should be submitted in Microsoft Word or plain text format to the following email address: dhc2012@sheffield.ac.ukCette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir.

The deadline for submissions is 30th April 2012. All proposers will be notified by 11th May 2012.

Discounted Registration

All successful proposers will be eligible for the early bird registration packages. Early bird registration will end on 31st May 2012.

Discounted full residential package incl. registration and ensuite bed and breakfast accommodation: £230 (full price: £280)
Discounted non-residential package: £119 (full price: £169)
Student full residential package incl. registration and ensuite bed and breakfast accommodation: £200
Student non-residential package: £100

Publication

All speakers will be invited to submit their paper for publication in the Humanities Research Institute’s new online journal, Studies in the Digital Humanities.

Further Information

The conference website will provide access to delegate registration as well as further information about the programme and facilities: http://hridigital.shef.ac.uk/dhc2012

For enquiries about submitting a proposal, please contact Michael Pidd: m.pidd@sheffield.ac.ukCette adresse email est protégée contre les robots des spammeurs, vous devez activer Javascript pour la voir.

The Humanities Research Institute is one of the UK’s leading centres for the digital humanities: http://hridigital.shef.ac.uk

The Network of Expert Centres is a collaboration of centres with expertise in digital arts and humanities research and scholarship, including practice-led research: http://www.arts-humanities.net

Centernet is an international network of digital humanities centres: http://digitalhumanities.org/centernet

 Source : Site de l’université.